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15 April 2011

“Renowned film director and photographer Wim Wenders discusses his new exhibition of mostly unpublished photographs with Professor Yve Lomax (Goldsmiths University), in his first show in London since 2003”.

some notes:

_ titles, captions, takes us towards a place,

_ place for things out of place

_ having a place, naming a place,

_ place brings displacement

_ strange and quiet :: as adjective or verbs

_ places becomes quietly strange and strangely quiet

_ as a traveler you discover places

_ getting lost as a royal experience

_ it is getting difficult to get lost

_ space are underrated, because there are basically no more unknown places in the world

_ the experience of being somewhere, looking at a place, start reading the place, is something we all forget to do, because we thing we know it already.

_ asking locals about the place as a big mistakes

_ we are loosing the ability of being somewhere, exposing ourselves, to read the traces we see and let the space tell us its story

_ a space can suggest a story (related to his movies)

_ the place belongs to the story and the story belongs to the place

_ story as an expression of that place :: “as soon as I start feeling I could be somewhere else and I could tell it somewhere else, I get very lost (…) not in a good way”

_ place steps into the background :: necessary process in film making.

_ photography gives the chance to give place a center stage and let it keep it :: stories becomes a bit more like a secret

_ photographer as a translater between the place and the viewer

_ but as soon as you have people, even in the photographs, they dominate it right away

_ sense of place once was critical for survival

_ how does a place affect me?

_ we as a result of a place

_ people can tell us about the place where they live, but we can also hear this from the place itself.

_ dangers are eliminated, there are maps, signs “please stand here, take a picture and move on”

_ to relate to a place not being a tourist

(to be continued :: 30:05)

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some quotes

I. The city as story

_ ”Memory is redundant: it repeats signs so that the city can begin to exist ” (Calvino 1972)

_ When moving through a city we are surrounded by places which have stories to tell. (…) The city is in a constant state of transformation, of change, and its places and buildings reveal to us what it used to be and what it is about to become.

_ Wim Wenders describes how the identity of a place is primarily a feeling of belonging produced out of each person`s memories. The places “talk” to us when they manage to create a connection to our experiences and memories.

_ How can a place tell a story?

IV.The architect as reteller

_  Everyone who uses a space, changes its story a bit, every new building changes the story about the city a little. The city and its stories can never be completed, it is always retold and it keeps on changing with the narrators, the users, and with ongoing processes and forces outside its realm. The dynamic state of the city is a challenge for those who take on the task to tell the new stories about it. Thus, the role of the narrator is not necessarily to tell a finished story about a place, but to create conditions for the people who live in the city to develop new uses, leave new traces and signs and take part in telling the future stories of the city

:: http://hurry-slowly.net/

some quotes

I. Reading the city

_ “there is no one narrative of a city, but many narratives construct cities in different ways highlighting some aspects and not others” (Bridge/Watson 2000). How we imagine the city will thus depend to a large extent on what our interest in the city is and what we want to know about it (King 2007).

_ the city as a collection of stories.

II. Maps and mapping

_ “Despite the common knowledge that the city is socially heterogeneous and an uneven space that is difficult to represent, it is often neutralized and reduced to a map” (Çinar/Bender 2007)

_ The map, and also the aerial photography, gives a description of the world as seen from above, and thus offers important knowledge about the dimensions, build-up and relationship between the city’s physical elements, such as streets, squares, parks, buildings etc. However, it does not capture the atmosphere of a place, and does not record the numerous stories which lie within the physical, tangible reality it describes.

III. Cognitive mapping and dérive

_ cognitive mapping

_ Dérives involve playful-constructive behaviour and awareness of psychogeographical effects, and are thus quite different from the classic notions of journey or stroll.” (Debord 1958). Through recording his aimless, dream-like walking through the streets of Paris, Debord made a series of “psycho-geographical” maps reflecting subjective perceptions of the everyday condition of the urban fabric. The resulting map was hence a cognitive one, rather than a mimetic description of the city (Corner 1999). The situationists, through this preference for a cognitive approach rather than a positivistic one, were making an attempt to return the map to the everyday (Corner 1996).

:: http://hurry-slowly.net/

some quotes

_ Berlin is a city where such a fragmentation can be clearly read. Not only through the inner-city emptiness, but also because of the many crashes of different realities which can be observed all over the city.

_ the city is pieced together of fragments from several historical layers.

_ After the fall of the Wall, large inner city areas lay empty, and a heated public debate arose on possible future developments and strategies; hence how the future stories of the city could be told.

_ Oswalt continues to claim that what is missing can never be replaced by something which simulates history, and that these buildings do therefore not create the desired homogeneous image. Rather, they add yet another dimension to the conglomerate city.

”Die Simulation können das Fehlende nicht ersetzen, sondern nur  auf das Vermisste verweisen. So wird in Berlin die Heterogenität der Stadt, die eigentlich kaschiert werden soll, um eine weitere Dimension bereichert” (Oswalt)

_ new projects have “failed to project an image that Berliners could recognise” (Bisky 2006).

_ Berlin is a conglomeration of parallel worlds.

_ urban development projects initiated by the planning authorities in Berlin after the reunification do not correspond with people’s perception of the realities of the city (…) “crashes of realities”

_ Temporary use has even turned out to be “an important component of urban planning in Berlin” (Overmeyer 2007).

_ A void so filled with history and memories would lie as a reminder, telling the story of the city with its emptiness.

_ Thus, in an empty space it was easier for him to recall his memories and reconstruct the former platz in his imagination (Casu and Steingut 2006). Wenders continues with comparing the function of empty and open spaces in a city to reading between the lines in a text: “…the empty spaces in the cities work like that as well. They encourage us to fill them up with ourselves” (ibid). Perhaps this points out the most crucial quality of empty space, that it is a space of opportunities, of future stories. Thus, these places trigger our imagination; encourage us to add our own stories to the city. Because where nothing exists, everything is possible.

„Wo nichts ist, ist alles vorstellbar.” Phillip Oswalt

:: http://hurry-slowly.net/

Just what is psychogeography, in a nutshell? “Break it down into its two parts,” she says. “It’s the psychological and the geographical. It’s about how we’re affected by being in certain places — architecture, weather, who you’re with — it’s just a general sense of excitement about a place.”

“When you remake your environment, or find wonderful things in it,” he says, “it breaks you out of the machine” Dave Mandl

The word psychogeography was coined in the late 1950s by the letterists and the situationists — French artists and social theorists who adopted the playful-serious agenda of the dadaists and surrealists in an effort to break through the crust of postwar conformity. But modern psychogeographers are equally influenced by earlier strains of urban adventure, including the 19th-century concept of the flaneur, the idle man-about-town who observed and commented on the urban scene. The most flaneur-like style of psychogeography, of course, is algorithmic walking — that “first right, second left” approach.

Our consciousness of what was important and unimportant, beautiful and dull, in a small town had been completely altered. Our psyches had a new relationship with geography.

by Joseph Hart

July / August 2004

Hans Ulrich Obrist: The last time we met was with Rem Koolhaas in 2001, and we spoke about what could be called your “city projects.” What are you working on related to this subject at the moment?

Antonio Negri: I can start by saying that while discussing the concept of the multitude, Michael Hardt and I found ourselves facing the question of the city, which we brought up as part of the question of the territorialization of the multitude, the space in which the multitude deploys itself. To be honest, I think that while a number of problems started to clear up after we wrote Multitude, others remained in the shadow, like this fundamental question of space.

Antonio Negri:   (…) But today the city, and the metropolis in particular, have become directly productive. And what exactly does this production consist of? I would say that it consists of the movement of people—it is in the construction of urban cooperation, in the liberty and the imagination of people who define and provoke it. Look at Brazil. They say “But there is so much misery…” And of course, it’s true! But I would respond, “Then go look what is in that misery.” Because there is an incredible capacity for creation in that misery, in those favelas. Music, human connections, and, of course, at times, deadly connections as well. But there is an enormous creativity that produces new things, and that creativity does not come without negative aspects.

HUO: (…) It’s a question that art students ask themselves a lot, and it bothers young artists too: one asks oneself whether there is still a space for resistance.

AN: Today the elements around which we can create points of reference—even points of resistance to the market—are the ones built on the land of the common. Because the common basically signifies that which costs nothing, that which is necessary, that which is participatory, that which is productive, and that which is free! And I believe that there are new use values already present in our common, and that these values can be easily spotted. Just think of the metropolis, where ninety percent of what we do are common things that cost us nothing—or at least could cost nothing if we made the effort to make them so…